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Yoga can Benefit both your Mental and Physical Health

The practice of yoga has been around for centuries. Originating in India, yoga was introduced to America in the late 1800’s. Since then, yoga has grown in popularity, and people who practice yoga are now in the millions, in fact, yoga can now be found in schools, hospitals, senior centers, prisons and office spaces.

The health benefits of practicing yoga are abundant, both mentally and physically. Yoga helps to build strength and increase flexibility, while also training your mind to improve concentration, reduce stress and find a balance in your emotional state.

Yoga class teaches you to move your body, train your mind to help reduce anxiety and focus on being kinder to oneself. It is a philosophy that helps you connect to your inner self by nourishing the part of us that makes us compassionate and kind.

Yoga is a peaceful practice, centered around a mindfulness that directs us to a higher level of consciousness, where in the moment, we take a mental time out and focus on the movement and the connections.

Basic yoga poses to try;

Forward Fold– Keeping your knees straight, slowly bend forward as far as you can comfortably go, place your hands on the ground in front of you or on the back of your calves.

Plank– Place your hands on the ground, arms straight over your wrists and walk back until your feet are directly behind you, creating a straight line from your shoulders to your heels.

Down Dog– From the plank position, shift your weight onto your heals and life your hips upward, leaving your heels as close to the ground as possible.

Tree– Stand with your hips shoulder-width apart, open your toes to distribute weight evenly on right food. Set your left foot on the inside of your right thigh. Bring hand together with open palms, and lift over head. TIP: Focus on an object at eye level to assist with balance.

Corpse pose– Working your way on to your back, lay flat with your arms to your side. Close your eyes and focus on your breathing.

Namaste

 

Special Enrollment Period (SEP)

Did you know that certain life changes may qualify you to enroll in health insurance coverage outside of the standard enrollment period?

Did you or anyone in your household lose qualifying health coverage in the last 60 days? If so, you would qualify for the special enrollment period.

Here are some examples of qualifying events:

  • Marriage
  • Birth of a child
  • Gained or became a dependent
  • Divorce or legal separation resulting in lose of health insurance
  • Death
  • Change in income
  • Change in zip code/primary place of living
  • Denied Medicaid or CHIP
  • Gained citizenship in the United States
  • Released from incarceration

 

If any of these apply to you or your family, please give us a call for a quote today!

 

 

Recent Study Looks At Health Care Pricing

According to a recently published healthcare economics paper, different insurers pay varied prices for the same services and procedures at the same hospital, indicating that bargaining leverage really does impact healthcare prices.

 

Authors took actual data from claims for three national insurers. Studies showed that dominate hospitals can dictate how much they are going to get paid for specific services and procedures. For hospitals that hold an monopoly in their area, that number was 12.5% higher than those who had nearby competitors. For more concentrated markets, providers can shift more risk to insurers, which affects the ability to keep prices at a set standard.

 

“The two main types of contracts use prospectively set prices that pay a fixed dollar amount based on the DRG classification code, or a model that sets payments as a percentage of hospital charges.
Hospitals are likely to prefer the latter because they get paid for every service they provide, and thus bear less risk. This drives prices up and also places less pressure on the hospital to reduce costs.”

 

In simply terms, it’s about negotiation. The hospital may charge $50,000 for a hip replacement, but the negotiated price may be more like $22,000, Medicare reimbursements would be even less.

 

“Researchers also found that prices increased by more than 6% when merging hospitals were less than 5 miles apart. They didn’t find significant price impact when the hospitals were separated by at least 25 miles.”

 

 

 

 

Sources: The Price Ain’t Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured Zack Cooper (Yale University) Stuart V. Craig (University of Pennsylvania) Martin Gaynor (Carnegie Mellon University and NBER) John Van Reenen (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, CEP, and NBER)

Modernhealthcare.com

Health Care Cost Institute