News

It’s Allergy Season | Be Prepared

With spring weather comes allergy season. Plants are starting to bloom and pollen is in the air to fertilize other plants. Pollen can also pollinate your nasal passages which can bring discomfort.

Be Prepared for Allergy Season

Common sources of allergies, sometimes referred as  ‘hay fever’ come from weeds, flowers, grasses, and trees. Symptoms include sneezing, itchy and watery eyes, and runny nose.

Your physcian can perform a skin prick test to help determine what you are allergic to so you can use the most appropriate treatment.

These simple tips can also help prevent reactions.

  1. Limit your time outdoors on high pollen days and keep your windows closed.  The local news is a great resource for sharing this information.
  2. Take over the counter medication after consulting with your physician.
  3. Change your bedding once a week to remove any pollen you may have brought indoors.
  4. Remove your shoes in the house to avoid dragging it in from outside.

Safe Opioid Disposal

Did you know that eighty percent of people addicted to heroin started with a legal prescription of an opioid?

Opioids are a common medication given to treat pain. Often, a patient prescribed these medications does not need the entire prescribed amount, leaving extra pills unused. Opioids can also be very addictive, thus a safe way to dispose of any unused amounts is important.

Some common opioids include:

  • Hydrocodone (Norco, Lortab, Vicodin, Zohydro)
  • Oxycodone (OxyContin, Percocet, Percodan, Roxicodone)
  • Morphine (MSIR, MS Contin)
  • Codeine (Tylenol #3, Phenergan with codeine)
  • Fentanyl  (Duragesic, Actiq)
  • Hydromorphone (Dilaudid)
  • Oxymorphone (Opana)
  • Meperidine (Demerol)
  • Tramadol (Ultram, ConZip)
  • Buprenorphine (Subutex, Suboxone, Butrans, Zubsolv)
  • Methadone (Dolophine, Methadose)

Intermountain Community Pharmacies provide collection sites for free.

For more information on safe disposal visit  http://useonlyasdirected.org/

 

Specialized Caregivers, you do not have to go it alone.

Being a caregiver for a special needs child or an elderly adult can be met with fear and uncertainty. After all, when a diagnosis is made or the aging process leaves a parent in need of continual help, an uncharted territory lies ahead for the caregiver.

No person needs to take on the role alone. Resources exist to connect caregivers with a community of other caregivers and organizations that can provide both financial and emotional support.

In fact, make that step number one.

 

  • Find a support system, build your tribe. That can be neighbors, friends, people from your congregation etc. People that understand [to the best of their ability] the situation and may even be a similar one. Take to the internet and seek out local organizations that deal with the same specific issue, talk and share with others.

 

  • Knowledge is power. Ask questions, find out everything you can about the diagnosis. Do your research and stay up to date on the latest treatments etc. for the condition. Being armed with the latest information is empowering.

 

  • Take care of you! The stresses of caring for others nonstop can be overwhelming. Take a break from time to time, ask for help from a trusted family member or friend. Often people around us wish to help, they just need to be told how. Local care agencies are another great resource to explore if you need it.