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Don't lose your health insurance.

Did you lose your job? Don’t lose your health insurance.

Don't lose your health insurance.

 

If you lose your job you need to act fast to get the insurance figured out.

There are multiple options for people who have recently lost insurance, but you only have 60 days to enroll through the federal exchange.

COBRA may not be the only option and you may even qualify for Medicaid.

Please call us today and let us help you navigate the options.

Tip # 3 From the Single Mom’s Guide to Health Insurance- Look at your income and cash flow situation.

There are two basic types of plans.

Traditional plans, which often have low copayments for regular visits, and High Deductible health plans.

Traditional plans are what many people used before healthcare reform. They had copayments
(a small amount due at the time of service) for regular Dr. visits and medications. They have
a deductible and coinsurance for unusual things like MRI’s, CT Scans, and hospital visits.

These plans tend to be more expensive every month, but generally require a smaller portion
to be paid by you when a claim happens.

High Deductible health plans are paired with a tax-protected savings account called a Health
Savings Account or HSA. These plans require that your deductible come first unless it is a
preventive service.

 

To download the complete guide, click here.

Offering Health Insurance is Good Way to Attract Millennials as Employees

 

A survey conducted by Anthem Life Insurance Company suggests that one in three millennial workers turned down a prospective job offer either due to insufficient health insurance coverage or none being offered at all.

 

As more millennials are entering marriage and purchasing homes, etc., concerns are shifting. Disability coverage is now part of the conversation and if employers are not offering it, many potential workers will keep walking. In addition, as millennials begin to start families, health insurance coverage, beyond the basics, is also important. Protecting themselves and their families become the forefront. Vision and dental are no longer looked at as optional add-ons, employees want to know they will have the coverage they need, or a loved might need to ensure peace of mind.

 

The Anthem survey also found that millennials are more likely than older workers to have engaged in long-term financial planning over the past year. Twenty-nine percent of millennials responded that they have conducted long-term financial planning, compared to 19% of 35 to 54-year-olds. (Anthem Life Insurance Company, March 2017)

 

Special Enrollment Period (SEP)

If you missed the Open Enrollment period and have had a “life” event, read on.

Did you know that certain life changes may qualify you to enroll in health insurance coverage outside of the standard enrollment period?

Did you or anyone in your household lose qualifying health coverage in the last 60 days? If so, you would qualify for the special enrollment period.

Here are some other examples of qualifying events:

  • Marriage
  • Birth of a child
  • Gained or became a dependent
  • Divorce or legal separation resulting in loss of health insurance
  • Death
  • Change in income
  • Change in zip code/primary place of living
  • Denied Medicaid or CHIP
  • Gained citizenship in the United States
  • Released from incarceration

 

If any of these apply to you or your family, please give us a call for a quote today!

 

 

 

Take a look at your providers

Tip #2 from “The Single Mom’s Guide to Health Insurance” – Take a look at your providers

Take a look at your providers
Do you always go to the same pediatrician? Is your nearest hospital your favorite? Make a list of all the providers you have seen over the last year, and add in any others that you plan to see in the next year. Either you, or your agent, will want to run this list through any potential insurance carriers to make sure you can still access your favorite providers.

To get the entire guide for free, click here.

 

If you need any help getting health insurance or if you have any questions, please reach out to us at 801-901-7800.

Huntsman Mental Health Institute Coming to University of Utah

 

The University of Utah President Ruth Watkins, announced on November 4, 2019  the Hunstman family has pledged $150 million to establish a mental health institute at the University of Utah.

 

“Suicide is increasing as a cause of death,” said Michael Good, University of Utah senior vice president for health services, CEO of University of Utah Health, and Dean of the University of Utah School of Medicine. “There just aren’t enough mental health professionals. We need to do better. This generous gift from the Huntsman family will allow us to support enhanced training for mental health professionals. It will allow us to reimagine care teams and how to better deliver mental health services across our state and across our region.” (ksltv.com)

 

The grant agreement also states the university will work with the Huntsman family to raise additional funds to increase community awareness in regards to mental health issues and will also provide financial support to the University Neuropsychiatric Institute (UNI) and to support mental health screenings to the 32,000 students including in rural areas.

Being a specialized caregiver, you do not have to go it alone.

 

Caring for a special needs child or an elderly adult can be met with fear and uncertainty. After all, when a diagnosis is made or the aging process leaves a parent in need of continual help, an uncharted territory lies ahead for the caregiver.

No person needs to take on the role alone. Resources exist to connect caregivers with a community of other caregivers and organizations that can provide both financial and emotional support.

In fact, make that step number one.

 

  • Find a support system, build your tribe. That can be neighbors, friends, people from your congregation etc. People that understand [to the best of their ability] the situation and may even be a similar one. Take to the internet and seek out local organizations that deal with the same specific issue, talk and share with others.

 

  • Knowledge is power. Ask questions, find out everything you can about the diagnosis. Do your research and stay up to date on the latest treatments etc. for the condition. Being armed with the latest information is empowering.

 

  • Take care of you! The stresses of caring for others nonstop can be overwhelming. Take a break from time to time, ask for help from a trusted family member or friend. Often people around us wish to help, they just need to be told how. Local care agencies are another great resource to explore if you need it.

 

 

Tips For A Safe And Healthy Summer

Summer time means fun in the sun, playing outdoors and outdoor recreation. There are few simple ways to keep our bodies healthy while enjoying the good weather.

Here are few tip to stay safe and healthy summer.

 

  1. Stay Hydrated- drink water. Water is important to good health. Drinking at least 8 glasses of water a day will help you stay hydrated in the summer heat. If you are active, up your intake.
  2. Wear Sunscreen- wearing at least a SPF 30 will help protect you from UV damage. Even if you are only going to be in the sun for a few minutes, lather it on.
  3. Stay cool- wear appropriate clothing and that is cool and light. Protect your eyes with sunglasses and if possible, wear a brimmed hat.
  4. Be fit, stay active-regular exercise contributes a healthy lifestyle overall. Being active in the early mornings or evenings will assist in not getting overheated. Wear a helmet when biking, riding a scooter, skateboarding etc.

Five Insurance Tips for Millennials

 

 

Millennials find themselves in the stage of life that may require them to purchase their own insurance. After having aged out of their parent’s insurance coverage and buying or renting a place to live, coverage needs may not be as black and white as one might think.

Knowing these five tips will help navigate through the sometimes-complicated policies out there.

  1. Shop smart for adequate coverage- Although cost is an important factor, having the coverage you need is equally important. You may be tempted to choose the least expensive plan but when it comes time to make a claim, you will see less of a financial benefit. In fact, a high deductible could cause a unexpected financial burden.
  2. Look for discounts- Often insurance carriers will offer discounts for bundling services, such as your home or rental insurance and your car insurance. In addition, there are discounts for being in school and getting good grades. Be sure to ask your agent about these and other possibilities.
  3. Fill in the gaps- An average policy will provide basic coverage but that may not be enough for all your coverage needs. For instance, a rental or homeowner’s policy may not cover personal items such as jewelry over a certain dollar amount.  Be sure to ask if you have collectables or higher value items. 
  4. Purchase life insurance- Life insurance is important, no matter how old you are. For a millennial, it may also save you money on a policy in the long run. It is especially important if you have children. Life insurance can help your family cover unexpected costs in your absence. If you have children, a life insurance policy can support their education or child care expenses.
  5. Consult an independent broker or agent- Talking with an independent insurance agent is the first step in finding the coverage you need and can afford. An independent broker works with multiple providers and can help you navigate the different policies and coverage. They can also help explain some of the terms and conditions that may be difficult to understand.

 

Spring cleaning beyond the home | Ark Insurance Solutions

Spring Cleaning Beyond the Home

Spring cleaning beyond the home | Ark Insurance Solutions

 

Spring is a time of renewal. Trees are budding, flowers are blooming and we tend to clean house with windows open, dusting off winter. One area of house cleaning you may not think to dive into is your beauty products. Keeping your products clean, and getting rid of old products, is important not only for hygienic purposes, but they can be breeding grounds for bacteria and fungi, especially makeup brushes.

Don’t share makeup.

Everyone has different body chemistry and sharing products you use can cause the spread of viruses and inflammation. For example, using someone’s lipstick can pass along the cold sore virus or using someone’s mascara can spread pink eye or other eye infections.

Clean those makeup brushes.

No need to buy a special cleaner for this, using a mild soap or shampoo is sufficient. Put a small amount in your hand and swirl the brush around, rinse well, and dry upright or flat. This is also a good time to wash out that cosmetic bag and those tweezers.

Purge products every six months if they are a liquid or a cream.

This includes liquid eyeliner and mascara, they can collect bacteria that causes eye infections. Powders tend to last a bit longer, so your sparkle powder eyeshadow has a few more months in them.Store beauty products in a cool, dry space. Humidity and heat can accelerate the growth of fungi and bacteria.

One final tip, when in doubt, throw it out. Holding on to something that may be contaminated is not worth the risk of illness or infections.