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Tip # 3 From the Single Mom’s Guide to Health Insurance- Look at your income and cash flow situation.

There are two basic types of plans.

Traditional plans, which often have low copayments for regular visits, and High Deductible health plans.

Traditional plans are what many people used before healthcare reform. They had copayments
(a small amount due at the time of service) for regular Dr. visits and medications. They have
a deductible and coinsurance for unusual things like MRI’s, CT Scans, and hospital visits.

These plans tend to be more expensive every month, but generally require a smaller portion
to be paid by you when a claim happens.

High Deductible health plans are paired with a tax-protected savings account called a Health
Savings Account or HSA. These plans require that your deductible come first unless it is a
preventive service.

 

To download the complete guide, click here.

Offering Health Insurance is Good Way to Attract Millennials as Employees

 

A survey conducted by Anthem Life Insurance Company suggests that one in three millennial workers turned down a prospective job offer either due to insufficient health insurance coverage or none being offered at all.

 

As more millennials are entering marriage and purchasing homes, etc., concerns are shifting. Disability coverage is now part of the conversation and if employers are not offering it, many potential workers will keep walking. In addition, as millennials begin to start families, health insurance coverage, beyond the basics, is also important. Protecting themselves and their families become the forefront. Vision and dental are no longer looked at as optional add-ons, employees want to know they will have the coverage they need, or a loved might need to ensure peace of mind.

 

The Anthem survey also found that millennials are more likely than older workers to have engaged in long-term financial planning over the past year. Twenty-nine percent of millennials responded that they have conducted long-term financial planning, compared to 19% of 35 to 54-year-olds. (Anthem Life Insurance Company, March 2017)

 

Special Enrollment Period (SEP)

If you missed the Open Enrollment period and have had a “life” event, read on.

Did you know that certain life changes may qualify you to enroll in health insurance coverage outside of the standard enrollment period?

Did you or anyone in your household lose qualifying health coverage in the last 60 days? If so, you would qualify for the special enrollment period.

Here are some other examples of qualifying events:

  • Marriage
  • Birth of a child
  • Gained or became a dependent
  • Divorce or legal separation resulting in loss of health insurance
  • Death
  • Change in income
  • Change in zip code/primary place of living
  • Denied Medicaid or CHIP
  • Gained citizenship in the United States
  • Released from incarceration

 

If any of these apply to you or your family, please give us a call for a quote today!

 

 

 

You may qualify for health insurance assistance

Below is the table that the federal government uses to determine health insurance assistance.

If your income falls between 135% and 400% of the federal poverty level for your family size you may qualify for assistance with your premiums.

Huntsman Mental Health Institute Coming to University of Utah

 

The University of Utah President Ruth Watkins, announced on November 4, 2019  the Hunstman family has pledged $150 million to establish a mental health institute at the University of Utah.

 

“Suicide is increasing as a cause of death,” said Michael Good, University of Utah senior vice president for health services, CEO of University of Utah Health, and Dean of the University of Utah School of Medicine. “There just aren’t enough mental health professionals. We need to do better. This generous gift from the Huntsman family will allow us to support enhanced training for mental health professionals. It will allow us to reimagine care teams and how to better deliver mental health services across our state and across our region.” (ksltv.com)

 

The grant agreement also states the university will work with the Huntsman family to raise additional funds to increase community awareness in regards to mental health issues and will also provide financial support to the University Neuropsychiatric Institute (UNI) and to support mental health screenings to the 32,000 students including in rural areas.

Open Enrollment Begins November 1–Five Factors to Consider.

 

Did you know there are five factors that can affect how much your health plan’s monthly premium under the health care law? However, individual states can limit how much these factors come into play.

These five factors are:

  • Age: Premiums can be up to 3 times higher for older people than for younger people.
  • Location: Where you live has a big effect on your premiums. Differences in competition, state and local rules and cost of living are the reasons why.
  • Tobacco use: Insurers can charge tobacco users up to 50% more than those who don’t use tobacco.
  • Individual vs. family enrollment: Insurers can charge more for a plan that also covers a spouse and/or dependents.
  • Plan category: Bronze, Silver, Gold, Platinum, and Catastrophic. The categories are based on how you and the plan share costs. Bronze plans usually have lower monthly premiums and higher out-of-pocket costs when you get care. Platinum plans usually have the highest premiums and lowest out-of-pocket costs.

In addition, insurance companies may offer more benefits, which could also affect costs. Furthermore, insurance companies can not charge women and men different prices for the same plan, nor can they take your current medical history or health into account when otherwise known as pre-existing conditions.

Being a specialized caregiver, you do not have to go it alone.

 

Caring for a special needs child or an elderly adult can be met with fear and uncertainty. After all, when a diagnosis is made or the aging process leaves a parent in need of continual help, an uncharted territory lies ahead for the caregiver.

No person needs to take on the role alone. Resources exist to connect caregivers with a community of other caregivers and organizations that can provide both financial and emotional support.

In fact, make that step number one.

 

  • Find a support system, build your tribe. That can be neighbors, friends, people from your congregation etc. People that understand [to the best of their ability] the situation and may even be a similar one. Take to the internet and seek out local organizations that deal with the same specific issue, talk and share with others.

 

  • Knowledge is power. Ask questions, find out everything you can about the diagnosis. Do your research and stay up to date on the latest treatments etc. for the condition. Being armed with the latest information is empowering.

 

  • Take care of you! The stresses of caring for others nonstop can be overwhelming. Take a break from time to time, ask for help from a trusted family member or friend. Often people around us wish to help, they just need to be told how. Local care agencies are another great resource to explore if you need it.

 

 

Tips For A Safe And Healthy Summer

Summer time means fun in the sun, playing outdoors and outdoor recreation. There are few simple ways to keep our bodies healthy while enjoying the good weather.

Here are few tip to stay safe and healthy summer.

 

  1. Stay Hydrated- drink water. Water is important to good health. Drinking at least 8 glasses of water a day will help you stay hydrated in the summer heat. If you are active, up your intake.
  2. Wear Sunscreen- wearing at least a SPF 30 will help protect you from UV damage. Even if you are only going to be in the sun for a few minutes, lather it on.
  3. Stay cool- wear appropriate clothing and that is cool and light. Protect your eyes with sunglasses and if possible, wear a brimmed hat.
  4. Be fit, stay active-regular exercise contributes a healthy lifestyle overall. Being active in the early mornings or evenings will assist in not getting overheated. Wear a helmet when biking, riding a scooter, skateboarding etc.
Spring cleaning beyond the home | Ark Insurance Solutions

Spring Cleaning Beyond the Home

Spring cleaning beyond the home | Ark Insurance Solutions

 

Spring is a time of renewal. Trees are budding, flowers are blooming and we tend to clean house with windows open, dusting off winter. One area of house cleaning you may not think to dive into is your beauty products. Keeping your products clean, and getting rid of old products, is important not only for hygienic purposes, but they can be breeding grounds for bacteria and fungi, especially makeup brushes.

Don’t share makeup.

Everyone has different body chemistry and sharing products you use can cause the spread of viruses and inflammation. For example, using someone’s lipstick can pass along the cold sore virus or using someone’s mascara can spread pink eye or other eye infections.

Clean those makeup brushes.

No need to buy a special cleaner for this, using a mild soap or shampoo is sufficient. Put a small amount in your hand and swirl the brush around, rinse well, and dry upright or flat. This is also a good time to wash out that cosmetic bag and those tweezers.

Purge products every six months if they are a liquid or a cream.

This includes liquid eyeliner and mascara, they can collect bacteria that causes eye infections. Powders tend to last a bit longer, so your sparkle powder eyeshadow has a few more months in them.Store beauty products in a cool, dry space. Humidity and heat can accelerate the growth of fungi and bacteria.

One final tip, when in doubt, throw it out. Holding on to something that may be contaminated is not worth the risk of illness or infections.

 

Spring Allergy Season|Ark Insurance Solutions

Be Prepared for Allergy Season

Spring Allergy Season|Ark Insurance Solutions

With spring weather comes allergy season. Plants are starting to bloom and pollen is in the air to fertilize other plants. Pollen can also pollinate your nasal passages which can bring discomfort.

Be Prepared for Allergy Season

Common sources of allergies, sometimes referred as  ‘hay fever’ come from weeds, flowers, grasses, and trees. Symptoms include sneezing, itchy and watery eyes, and runny nose.

Your physician can perform a skin prick test to help determine what you are allergic to so you can use the most appropriate treatment.

These simple tips can also help prevent reactions.

  1. Limit your time outdoors on high pollen days and keep your windows closed.  The local news is a great resource for sharing this information.
  2. Take over the counter medication after consulting with your physician.
  3. Change your bedding once a week to remove any pollen you may have brought indoors.
  4. Remove your shoes in the house to avoid dragging it in from outside.

Over the counter medications can help, but natural remedies can also be the answer.

Here are a few to try:

Quercetin-found in colorful fruits and vegetables

Vitamin C- provides a natural antihistamine effect.

Saline Nasal Spray